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Wednesday, August 31, 2016

2001 dodge ram 1500 5.2 alternator not working


I'm working on a friends truck that the battery keeps dying. He got another alt from the salvage yard and its doing the same thing as the original. The gauge in the dash will read about 13 volts while idling but if you take it for a drive the check gauges light will come on and the charging gauge will drop as far as it can. it has power to the main feed from the battery to the alt but not to the two smaller wires plugged into the back of the alt. any ideas?

RESPONSE

If this is one of the type of alternators that has the integral
regulator built-in, there should be a place where you can insert a
Phillips screwdriver or small metal rod to ground a tab on the
regulator to force the alternator to put out full current. If it has
that and it doesn't put out full current at a higher than normal
voltage (should be over 14 volts, could be close to 15 volts), then
the alternator is at fault. If it does put out that voltage and higher
current then perhaps the regulator is faulty if the voltage doesn't
stay around 13.5 volts when the alternator is running without using
this trick to test the alternator.

You can get a decent current tester like this one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-SEARS-Starter-Generator-ALT-Indicater-Current-Amp-Tester-NEW-9442145-/182255638946

to check current. It clips over the battery cable. If you reverse the
connection it will reverse the direction on the meter, so make sure
you're reading current output from the alternator. The smaller channel
on the rear of the tester is for lower amperage readings. The larger
one is for starting current.

Is the battery in good condition? Does it hold a charge?

Monday, August 08, 2016

Where is the Freon going?


Below is a Real Fix from Mitchell 1′s new SureTrack®
expert information source. These documented issues from actual shop repair orders demonstrate how SureTrack can help you correct issues that are not easily diagnosed using OEM information alone. SureTrack is currently available free in our ProDemand product.
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Where’s the Freon Going?

It’s hot outside! Where’s the refrigerant going? SureTrack community member Lutters had a Prius in their shop that repeatedly lost its Air Conditioning System Freon. They posed the question to the community, and with the help of fellow community member ericsautomotive and others, they were able to resolve the issue.

The following Real Fix summarizes the interaction between them in the community that led to the solution.

Auto Repair Manuals

Get everything you need to diagnose and repair your car problems today. Online access to the same auto repair information the dealership uses. 

Vehicle
2010 Toyota Prius BASE 1.8
Title
Repeat A/C Refrigerant Loss, Replaced Evaporator
Complaint
Car came in 1 month ago for poor air conditioning cooling. Found refrigerant level .8# low. No obvious leaks.
Diagnostic Steps Performed/Parts Replaced
Recharged and added dye. Came in today, less than 1 month later for poor cooling, system down .3#. Very hard to see condenser but no dye seen and no sniffer results. Took blower motor out and used sniffer and camera with black light and found no leaks. All A/C lines and compressor are good.
Best Answer from Community
No dye on the outside = No high side leaks….. It’s got to be on the inside!!! There are TSBs on odor and other Evap issues. Did you try sniffing the drain while system is on low speed?
Member Name: ericsautomotive
Cause
After rechecking a week later, we found traces of dye on the frame section directly below the evaporator drain tube. The only way to see this was with a mirror and black light.

Correction
Replaced A/C evaporator and has been good since.

Monday, July 11, 2016

Hydraulic radiator fan Lincoln LS


Below is a Real Fix from Mitchell 1′s new SureTrack®
expert information source. These documented issues from actual shop repair orders demonstrate how SureTrack can help you correct issues that are not easily diagnosed using OEM information alone. SureTrack is currently available free in our ProDemand product.
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Hydraulics, Cool?

The cooling fan on this Lincoln LS is common because it’s hydraulically powered. Since this fan is hydraulic, oil pressure dictates the speed of the fan. When the solenoid controlling the flow of pressure fails, the fan no longer operates properly and the vehicle is prone to overheating. Don’t let the P1299 trouble code get you heated and use this Real Fix to solve the overheating fault.

Auto Repair Manuals

Get everything you need to diagnose and repair your car problems today. Online access to the same auto repair information the dealership uses. 

Vehicle
2001, Lincoln LS, 3.0L
Title
P1299, Replaced Hydraulic Fan Solenoid
Complaint
The customer states the check engine light is on.
Cause
Connected a scan tool and found code P1299 – Cylinder Head Over Temperature Protect. Inspected the engine coolant level and condition and found no faults. Started the vehicle, allowed the engine to idle and noticed the vehicle began to overheat after 20 minutes. Also, observed the hydraulic fan did not engage. Used a multi-meter to check for power and ground at the hydraulic fan solenoid and found both were present. Inspected the hydraulic fan solenoid wiring harness and found no faults. This indicated the hydraulic fan solenoid was faulty.

Correction
Replaced the hydraulic fan solenoid, cleared codes, performed a road test and verified the vehicle operated properly. The check engine light did not illuminate and no fault codes returned.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Replacing A/C compressor, rec/drier, etc.on 1998 Chevy S-10

I replaced an Air Conditioning compressor on my 1998 S-10 4-cyl (2.2L engine)
pick up 3 to 5 years ago. The system is once again not working, though
the electric A/C compressor clutch kicks in OK. Pressure is nearly the
same between the high and low sides, which I believe whas what
happened before I replaced the compressor the last time.

I had replaced it with a Chinese made copycat compressor and a
receiver drier, and possibly an orifice tube (not sure about the last
item). I hooked everything up loosely and let a backyard (but
licensed) A/C mechanic finish the job with the proper O-rings, oil,
refrigerant, etc., and the job included a flush of the condenser and
evaporator coils and the connecting plumbing.

I do not know if the flush was thorough enough but I did watch him
flush the system. I plan to purchase the canister to put the flushing
fluid into to flush my system before putting the new compressor and
receiver-drier on and doing a vacuum on the system then charging it.

I would like to do the replacement myself this time. I have the gauge
set and a vacuum pump and have used it since the last time I got the
replacement done on other vehicles, including evacuating and
recharging an A/C system on a 97 Mazda Protege. I can follow
directions well enough as I've rebuilt a Honda Accord engine by
following the instructions in a repair manual and asking a few
questions of friends who have experience with this sort of thing.

First, I've found a complete parts set of a compressor and receiver
drier on Rock Auto dot com for a reasonable price. I can add less than
$100 more and get a condenser coil, but I am not sure I need it (see
next paragraph).

I have read where some of the very newest vehicles use such tiny tubes
in the condenser coils that they are near impossible to flush.
However, I don't know if they were that small in '98 or not, so I need
some input here as to whether I can just flush the original condenser
and re-use it or not???

Also, when I flush the various sections of the system, I would
appreciate knowing which hose/port and direction to flush the fluid
through, or does it matter which direction I force the fluid through
the system when it's opened up???

I don't plan to be stingy with the fluid even though it's not cheap.
If I use a whole gallon on the system that's fine with me if I need
to. But if I only need to buy a fraction of that then I can save some
money there, too. So how much of this flush fluid will I need to buy?

Does it store well when unused for a long time if tightly sealed?

I will also need to know what sort of torque to apply to the bolts on
the fittings at the compressor and anywhere else I need to be careful
about torque. I might not be able to torque the hose fittings as I
only have a wrench which will fit sockets but I am open to any
suggestions or help. This is my first A/C compressor replacement job
so I want to approach it cautiously and get whatever advice that might
be helpful. The previous replacement I didn't really do any of the
technical work, though I"ve learned about the evacuation and recharge
process and have done that successfully on the Mazda.

Any help with this would be appreciated. I've posted this to the two
groups which have helped me the most in my various automotive repairs.
Both groups have helped me in the past with my S-10, and I thank you
all for that.

I will wait a few days for replies to come in before I order anything.
If I need to buy a condenser coil also (and I'd rather not so I can
avoid the extra work of removing and replacing it in this hot summer
weather), I can get it cheaper in a set from Rock Auto.

If any of you use Rock Auto and know how to find generic items like
the flush fluid instead of me buying it through ebay (or if you have a
better source), please share that, too. I can find model-specific
parts very easily but when it comes to the generic stuff I find it
hard to find there, but I would think they would have those items too.
Thanks in advance.

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Chevy Tahoe Tachometer does not work

Super Ignition Switch

What is the solution when the key in your customer’s vehicle turns way too easily? Either you gained super strength overnight or the ignition switch housing is damaged. The second option is probably your best bet. You don’t need super powers to solve this issue, just this Real Fix and a little time.

Auto Repair Manuals

Get everything you need to diagnose and repair your car problems today. Online access to the same auto repair information the dealership uses. 
Vehicle2003, Chevrolet Tahoe, 5.3L
 
Title: 
Tachometer Inoperative, Repaired Engine Wiring Harness

Complaint: 
The customer states the vehicle’s tachometer does not respond to the change in engine speed.

Cause

Performed a road test to duplicate the customer’s concern and found the vehicle’s tachometer did not respond to the change in engine speed. Performed a road test while monitoring live data on the scan tool and observed the tachometer readings differed from the engine speed data parameter readings. Connected a lab scope to the RPM OUT terminal at powertrain control module connector 2, measured the voltage signal, and observed the signal did not change when the engine speed varied. Disassembled the engine wiring harness, traced the RPM OUT circuit and discovered the RPM OUT wire had stretched in the engine wiring harness, which caused the open circuit.

Correction
Repaired the engine wiring harness, cleared codes, performed a road test and verified the vehicle operated properly.

Monday, June 06, 2016

Honda Code p1361 and Code p1366

Below is a Real Fix from Mitchell 1′s new SureTrack®
expert information source. These documented issues from actual shop repair orders demonstrate how SureTrack can help you correct issues that are not easily diagnosed using OEM information alone. SureTrack is currently available free in our ProDemand product.
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P1361 – TDC Sensor 1 Circuit Intermittent Interruption and P1366 – TDC Sensor 2 Circuit Intermittent Interruption

Windshield washer fluid is for the windshield, not the top dead center sensor. Even a component as simple as a windshield washer hose can cause big trouble. Follow along with this unique Real Fix and wash away the trouble codes.

Auto Repair Manuals

Get everything you need to diagnose and repair your car problems today. Online access to the same auto repair information the dealership uses. 

Vehicle2000, Honda Odyssey EX, 3.5L
 
Title
P1361, P1366, Cleaned Top Dead Center Sensor Harness Connectors, Replaced Windshield Washer Hose

Complaint
The customer states the check engine light is on.

Cause

Connected a scan tool and found codes: P1361 – TDC Sensor 1 Circuit Intermittent Interruption and P1366 – TDC Sensor 2 Circuit Intermittent Interruption. Performed a visual inspection of the engine compartment and found traces of washer fluid on both of the top dead center sensor harness connectors. Traced the washer fluid leak and found a broken windshield washer hose. Upon further inspection, found the damaged windshield washer hose leaked washer fluid onto the top dead center sensor harness connectors.

Correction
Replaced the windshield washer hose and cleaned the top dead center sensor harness connectors, cleared the codes, performed a road test and verified the vehicle operated properly. The check engine light did not illuminate and no fault codes returned.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

engine does not crank Jeep Grand Cherokee


Super Ignition Switch

What is the solution when the key in your customer’s vehicle turns way too easily? Either you gained super strength overnight or the ignition switch housing is damaged. The second option is probably your best bet. You don’t need super powers to solve this issue, just this Real Fix and a little time.


Auto Repair Manuals

Get everything you need to diagnose and repair your car problems today. Online access to the same auto repair information the dealership uses. 
Vehicle2003, Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo, 4.0L
 
Title
Engine Does Not Crank, Replaced Ignition Switch Housing

Complaint
The customer states the engine does not crank.

Cause

Confirmed the customer’s complaint and found the engine did not crank. Noticed the ignition switch did not have resistance when turning the key nor did the switch have spring back when the key was turned to the start position. Used a multi-meter and verified voltage was not present at the starter solenoid when the ignition was switched to the start position. Disconnected the electrical portion of the ignition switch, manually turned the switch to the start position and found the engine started normally. Visually inspected the ignition key switch and the ignition switch housing and found the housing was cracked, which allowed the entire ignition key switch to rotate freely in the housing.

Correction
Replaced the ignition switch housing and verified the vehicle operated properly. The customer’s concern did not return.

Monday, May 09, 2016

Where do I add oil to my engine?



Sometimes we forget just how little is taught when it comes to taking care of the simplest things when it comes to cars. We depend on them every day to get us to and from work but show them very little attention once we get there. One of the most important things to keep an eye on is the engines oil level. And when it is low, topping it off so we can continue to rely on them each day.

Locating the engine oil cap requires looking under the hood. Don't be scared. It is usually clearly identified with the word "OIL" marked on the top of the oil fill cap. Turn the cap to the left just like opening your 20 oz. beverage of choice. Add the appropriate amount of oil and tighten the cap back on.

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Is my car overheating?


Is my car overheating?


I own a 1995 Oldsmobile Cutlass Sierra with 66,000 miles.  My temperature indicator has been going over 1/2 and up to 3/4 and almost into the red zone. Is my car overheating? It usually always stayed on 1/2 while driving or while in idle. 

I took it to get checked and the mechanic said that it is not the thermostat or the radiator and he put an instrument on the thermostat and it registered 200  and on two other places that registered 180.  He thinks it is the Temperature indicator that is faulty and is going to install a new one on my dashboard when the part comes in.

I noticed yesterday that on the floor of the front seat passenger side that it was wet.  I felt around and it does feel like it has an oily feel.  I park under a canopy and usually the car is not in the rain and it hadn't rained lately so I know it isn't a leak.  My friend told me it could be coolant leaking out of the heater core, etc. 

I take the car for short hops and the indicator never goes into the red part but it makes me nervous as I don't want to drive an overheated car and ruin the engine. 

Does anyone out there have any ideas of what it may be?    Dolores,  Who has to keep this car on the road as I have no money to buy another.  Only use it on short hops, etc......  

Monday, February 29, 2016

Aftermarket stereo mount 2001 Ford Taurus


I've installed my own car stereos in about 10 vehicles now. It's been a while and I'm experiencing major sticker shock at the cost of mounting kits for this car. It's got that obnoxiously all-inclusive panel that has both the radio and temperature dials combined, and runs around $60 and up all over the internet. I really don't want to spend that much.

I've taken a good look-see at the dash. I thought an under dash mount (which runs only about $12) would be a good alternative, as I don't intend to keep this car through next winter and it would be easier than swapping the OEM stereo out and then having to swap it back when I sell the car. But the underside of that part of the dash is a big gaping hole with no real place to screw into.

I'm about ready to just connect the wiring harness and lay the darned thing on the floor if i can't find a better alternative. It's got a remote control and I mostly intend to use it to plug my MP3 player into the input jacks on the back anyway.

Any ideas?